Hiking Pack

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flippyza
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Hiking Pack

Post by flippyza » Mon Aug 24, 2015 12:45 pm

Hi everyone.

I'm trying to decide on what hiking bag to get. I will be using this for both traveling and for hiking (hikes will be 5 - 6 days longs.
At the moment I am trying to decide between the First Ascent Jupiter 65L+10 and the Oztrail Adventurer 60 Backpack.
I would prefer to spend around the amount of the Oztrail one but I am not sure it is any good. Was hoping someone may have one or have used one and can give their opinion.

The only requirements I have are that it must have a hydration compartment and a rain cover.

Can anyone recommend another pack?

Thanks

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Justin
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Justin » Mon Aug 24, 2015 1:33 pm

Hi Gary,

Definitely have a look at the Osprey bags (we have 4 of their bags in the family and they're all awesome). They meet your 2 requirements and are also guaranteed for life.
See this link for details and product choice: http://www.adventureinc.co.za/brands/osprey/

See also:
- Packback
- Best bag for backpacking?
- Hiking Packs
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Justin
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Justin » Mon Aug 24, 2015 2:06 pm

Not sure of your location, but you might find something here :thumleft: http://www.climbing.co.za/2015/08/adven ... mber-2015/
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mokganjetsi
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by mokganjetsi » Mon Aug 24, 2015 2:27 pm

i'm also vouching for osprey - amazing packs; and with their guarantee it's hard to beat on a value basis
word is that Mountain Hardwear gear has been taking a dip after the company was sold to a big player (soooo bleak!)
i found that the local manufacturers have good clothing, okay sleeping bags and generally suspect technical gear (given that most of their technical design is rip-offs).
and for 5-6 day hikes you should probably look at a 75+l pack (having a smaller pack with tons of stuff strapped on the outside defeats the purpose)

enjoy the hunt :thumleft:

flippyza
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by flippyza » Mon Aug 24, 2015 3:04 pm

Thanks for the suggestions so far.

I like the Osprey packs, thinking about the Volt 75 as well now. Only thing I don't like is that it doesn't come with a rain cover, even on the Aether 70 (except the European one but the the cover goes in the top of the bag)
Justin wrote:Not sure of your location, but you might find something here :thumleft: http://www.climbing.co.za/2015/08/adven ... mber-2015/
Unfortunately I live JHB

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GClamp
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by GClamp » Mon Aug 24, 2015 3:55 pm

I have a Volt 75

Great Bag, would definitely recommend.

having to pay extra for the rain cover sucks though :(
mokganjetsi wrote:i found that the local manufacturers have good clothing, okay sleeping bags and generally suspect technical gear (given that most of their technical design is rip-offs).
agree with this statement 100%

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Justin
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Justin » Mon Aug 24, 2015 9:07 pm

If you buy a bag (any bag) without a cover I'll give you an old/new First Ascent rain cover (it's never been used).
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mokganjetsi
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by mokganjetsi » Tue Aug 25, 2015 9:42 am

i'm not a big fan of a built-in rain cover - they inevitably start to leak after a few years and then you have to cut the thing out. buying a loose rain cover sorts out that problem and it has multiple uses. doesn't break the bank either.

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Justin
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Justin » Tue Aug 25, 2015 10:44 am

Mok, I agree with you about the built in covers.
The Osprey and FA bag covers are independent of the bag.

Regarding leaking... I resprayed my Gore-Tex rain jacket with Nikwax and it's as good as new (yes, I was surprised).
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Old Smelly
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Old Smelly » Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:10 am

I have to agree that a loose rain cover is a better idea and should not be a driving requirement.

At this moment in time compare the Osprey with whatever Karrimor, Vaude and Black Diamond packs that you can try on. In truth the most important aspect is that a pack is like a pair of climbing shoes - if it doesn't fit it doesn't matter whatever else it does well!

So what I am saying is take the pack off the shelf, shove it full of ropes and things and put it on your back - then adjust the straps until it feels right - then walk around with it on your back in the shop for 20 minutes...get the idea?

Drifters in Sandton will let you do that. Maybe even Trappers will too. That's the least you can do.

Or buy it over the web on spec and take your chances...
Really, its not that bad...I think it's my shoes...

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Nic Le Maitre
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Nic Le Maitre » Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:31 am

Whatever size of bag you buy, you will fill it. For 5 days you certainly don't need a 75l bag. All you will be doing is carrying the extra weight of the bag and whatever else you can stuff in there. Certainly, you will be able to take 3 different fleeces (and complete changes of clothes) so you have the ideal one for all conditions but really, do you need to?

I'm not the biggest guy so my stuff is generally smaller but I doubt that it makes that much difference really. I can manage to fit everything I need for a 5 day hike into my 42L pack. It's more about where things can serve more than one role, for instance: do you need a bowl and a pot?
Happy climbing
Nic

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Justin
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Justin » Tue Aug 25, 2015 12:00 pm

Agree with Old Smelly re: Try before you buy!

I've got the Osprey Aether 70L & the previous model (which was a 75L).
Your build does have to do with size of bag, how you pack it and how much you should be carrying - some say that if you have the space then you tend to pack more than you need.

I'm impressed that Nic can get away with a 42L bag for 5 days! (And I consider myself a bit of minimalist) - here's a list of what goes into my hiking bag (area and season dependent):

• Overnight hiking bag - All non waterproof equipment to be placed inside bag liner
• Warm sleeping bag (bag must have at least 0’ degrees rating)
• Sleeping mat/mattress
• Clothing – including gloves, extra pair of socks, beanie, fleece jacket/top, waterproof shell with hood (jacket + longs), down jacket, long pants, shorts, t-shirts, thermal underwear, (remember to try and avoid cotton clothing as much as possible & “There is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing”.

• Suitable hiking shoes/boots
• Gaiters
• First Aid Kit – with list of emergency telephone numbers inside
• Emergency blanket / Survival bag
• 4x litre water containers
• Sun hat
• Camera
• Whistle
• Cell phone (fully charged)
• Headlamp (with new or extra batteries)
• Sunscreen
• Toiletries
• Medication (if required)
• Stove with spare/sufficient fuel
• Matches and lighter
• Pots and eating utensils & cup
• Sufficient food for the meals + one extra meal for emergencies. Snacks, energy drink sachets, chocolate, Tea/coffee
• 2 man Mocha pot
• Map, compass, pen, paper, ruler, GPS for backup.
• Knife / Multi Tool
• Tent (optional)
• Water purification tablets / kit
• Walking sticks (optional)
• Mountain walking rope + sling & 1 biner
• Spade / trowel and toilet paper
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mokganjetsi
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by mokganjetsi » Tue Aug 25, 2015 12:11 pm

Nic Le Maitre wrote:Whatever size of bag you buy, you will fill it.
True that!
Nic Le Maitre wrote:I'm not the biggest guy so my stuff is generally smaller but I doubt that it makes that much difference really. I can manage to fit everything I need for a 5 day hike into my 42L pack.
Seriously? Does that include a tent? And what do you eat? (Quite remarkable)..... I tend to fill my 90l Osprey for 5+day hikes (the 75l Volt is lekka for 3/4 day hikes. But I rock XLs and normally carry a tent plus cooking gear & sleep comfy.....and above all i love to eat well on a hike (probably eat better than at home). lots of fresh stuff.

biggest pack i have carried was on the Berg Grand Traverse - self sufficient for 11-days. filled the big Osprey to the brim, fully extended (106l).....weighed at least 35kg on day 1.

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Nic Le Maitre
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Nic Le Maitre » Tue Aug 25, 2015 1:21 pm

Damn Justin, does that list include the Sherpa to carry all that crap? :)

@Willem: Tent, sometimes; then usually when hiking with others so we can split it.

Gear-wise:
Sleeping bag
Mattress
Groundsheet/tarp (the one from my Bibler I-Tent one is really great)
Food - usually cous-cous sachets with Pesto, trail-mix and Pro-Nutro/whatever
MSR XGK stove
Fuel Bottle
2.5l Water
One pot for everything
Rain gear good enough for the conditions, I have two different sets, one for summer, one for winter
Softshell
Clean socks
Very basic first aid kit, bandages and gauze
Camera
Headlamp
Hat
Sunscreen
Leatherman
One of those fold flat cups and tea bags

On the first aid kit side of things:
I've learnt over many years of hiking and rescue that there is very little you can do to save someone's life except stop them bleeding heavily and do CPR, so I can stuff to deal with that and leave the rest. Drugs are a pain in the ass because they expire, people frequently are often allergic to them or you are unsure of the required dose. Also with the exception of (possibly) adrenalin and asthma pumps there is very little that we as lay people can carry that will make any real difference in an emergency. Most of the time your best option will be go for help and you can't do that weighed down by 90L of crap.
Happy climbing
Nic

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Nic Le Maitre
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Nic Le Maitre » Tue Aug 25, 2015 1:27 pm

Oh and I love my BD packs, I've had a Jackal for 8 years that is still going strong and I have an Epic that is 2 years old and fantastic.

The people who sold me my Karrimor daypack gave such crap service when I took it back with a broken zip (the only non-YKK zip on it) that I've been put off Karrimor forever. "I'm sorry, we'll have to send that off to the agents to see if they can repair it and you'll not have a bag for 4 weeks" - Lifetime guarantee - whatever
Happy climbing
Nic

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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by mokganjetsi » Tue Aug 25, 2015 2:54 pm

Nic Le Maitre wrote:Most of the time your best option will be go for help and you can't do that weighed down by 90L of crap.
hehe well i can ditch whatever i need to if it comes down to it.......each to his own then; i love my big load hauler. and the look of envy on my fellow hiker's faces when my dinner is this looks like it was prepared in a gourmet Mediterranean restaurant :wink:

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GClamp
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by GClamp » Tue Aug 25, 2015 5:01 pm

Nic Le Maitre wrote:The people who sold me my Karrimor daypack gave such crap service when I took it back with a broken zip (the only non-YKK zip on it) that I've been put off Karrimor forever. "I'm sorry, we'll have to send that off to the agents to see if they can repair it and you'll not have a bag for 4 weeks" - Lifetime guarantee - whatever
I remember around 10 years ago Karrimor was "the" bag. However, I think the company was sold off to a larger UK sports company and they have never been the same since. I think the guy that used to supply them in Lansdowne opened up his own brand, Red Mountain, or something like that.

I remember I bought a K-Way 65L bag in 2003. Well needless to say literally everything broke on it. My friends Karrimor's, bought around the same time, are still going strong.

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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by tygereye » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:58 am

I agree that the size of your bag depends on how you pack.
I've got a 15+ year old Karrimor 65L (the old, good stuff) with which I did a 9 day hike (no tent, but I ate well - fresh food & veg, etc). It was packed to the brim!
I also took it on 6-7 day hikes with a 3-man tent split between 3 people.

For a guy, I think in general a 85L will serve well on a 5-6 day hike.

And DO go and try out the bags - no matter how adjustable it is, some will carry better than others; and you and that bag tend to become one on those longer hikes.

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Nic Le Maitre
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Nic Le Maitre » Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:55 am

Less space means that you are forced to consider what you are packing a lot more.

For instance, Justin says he carries a down jacket. Mostly it's never cold enough to hike in one, so you'll only ever use it when stationary at the camping spot, and then you have a sleeping bag if it is cold.
mokganjetsi wrote:hehe well i can ditch whatever i need to if it comes down to it.......each to his own then; i love my big load hauler. and the look of envy on my fellow hiker's faces when my dinner is this looks like it was prepared in a gourmet Mediterranean restaurant :wink:
I enjoy the look of envy when my fellow hikers stagger into camp, in the dark, totally finished from carrying far too much junk, hours after I got there...
Happy climbing
Nic

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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by mokganjetsi » Wed Aug 26, 2015 3:41 pm

ha! we can start a fast packer vs fat packer debate, a bit like sport vs trad :wink:

know how much you can carry, and carry no more than that. personally i like a heavy pack - i enjoy the exertion and the comforts i carry with me as a reward.
i have seen guys trying to go minimalist and light, only to freeze their butts off, starve or sit with puppy dog eyes when you're munching on a gourmet lunchtime sarmie.
i have seen a guy going on his 3-yearly hike packing beer, olives in a glass container and a stainless steel pan + muffin mix. unfortunately he did not have enough myprodals for his buggered knees on day 3.

and disagreement there on the down jacket bro. i love being able to sit outside under the stars sipping a good single malt, or feeling all toasty when enjoying a fresh brew & waiting for the sunrise. that's not excess in my books; that is what the experience is all about for me.

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Nic Le Maitre
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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by Nic Le Maitre » Thu Aug 27, 2015 8:33 am

mokganjetsi wrote:and disagreement there on the down jacket bro. i love being able to sit outside under the stars sipping a good single malt, or feeling all toasty when enjoying a fresh brew & waiting for the sunrise. that's not excess in my books; that is what the experience is all about for me.
For sure, I enjoy those things too, it's just that you can wrap your sleeping bag around you and achieve the same thing.

I'm also a fan of eating well, when it doesn't spoil the rest of the trip. On short hikes, say one or two nights, then I carry the kitchen sink (and a pan to make pancakes). But for longer stuff, I look at everything and evaluate its usefulness. Generally stuff that only does one thing gets left behind.
Happy climbing
Nic

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Re: Hiking Pack

Post by flippyza » Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:57 am

Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
Think I am going to try find a place the has the Osprey Volt and go give that a try first and see from there.
Not in such a rush to get it so going to take my time.

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